Not against Flesh and Blood – Part III: Democracy in Afghanistan and the Human Heart

Democracy and Afghanistan In my two previous posts in this series, here and here, I wrote indirectly about the idea of just action during war (Jus in bello) and just cause leading up to war (Jus ad bellum). First, I implied that as a Christian soldier, prayer for our enemies is one means to acting justly … Continue reading Not against Flesh and Blood – Part III: Democracy in Afghanistan and the Human Heart

Not Against Flesh and Blood – Part II: Revisiting Iraq

In his excellent book In Defence of War, Oxford theologian Nigel Biggar ends his treatise on Just War Theory with a detailed and incisive chapter on the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Biggar gives a thorough examination of the lead-up to the war, maintaining that, in spite of all the errors made, and all the voices of dissent, … Continue reading Not Against Flesh and Blood – Part II: Revisiting Iraq

Übermensch meet Jedermann

Friedrich Nietzsche thought of his Übermensch, or “over-man,” as being “beyond good and evil.” He, or she, was to exist as a moral authority unto themselves, a lover of “this-world” who, unbound by transcendental norms or obligations, acted as creator and implementer of their own moral structures. For Nietzsche, of course, and many later existentialists, the … Continue reading Übermensch meet Jedermann

Jordan Peterson, Atheism, and Jungian Interpretations of Christianity

Recently, I watched yet another video of Jordan Peterson. This time on Justin Brierly’s show, Unbelievable, on Premier Christian Radio. The series, called “The Big Conversations” pits various theists and atheists in dialogue on life’s most meaningful questions. Here again, however, Peterson is a sort of strange figure, in that it is hard to identify … Continue reading Jordan Peterson, Atheism, and Jungian Interpretations of Christianity